Impatiens

Classic almost care free summer annual. Beautiful full clusters of flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love.

Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana) February 25, 2012

Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)

Richard K. ZimmermanWVU Extension ServicePlant Sciences & Conservation Specialist

Family: Balsaminaceae–Balsam family
Scientific Name: Impatiens wallerana
Origin: Tanzania to Mozambique
Classification: Annual, houseplant
Use: Hanging basket, bedding, pot culture, window boxes
Height: 9 to 30 inches
Spread: 9 to 30 inches
Hardiness: Indoors 50oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC); outdoors until frost
Flowers: Early summer to fall; solitary in racemes on terminal and axillary shoots; up to 2� inches in diameter; solid colors of white, pink, salmon, purple, orange or red, and many bicolor; single, double and semi-double; numerous
Fruit: Capsule, � inch long, glabrous
Stems (Bark): Herbaceous, fleshy, green 
Foliage: Alternative, upper leaves sometimes opposite; lanceolate-ovate; green or reddish green on both surfaces
Texture: Fine to medium
Growth Rate: Rapid
Form: Spreading, rounded, flat topped
Insects & Diseases: Scale, spider mites, aphids; damping off
Propagation: Seed sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks before last occurrence of frost (late February to mid-March); give bright light but not direct sun; artificial lights, such as Grow Lamps, should be used–place 6 to 12 inches above the flats for 12 to 14 hours a day; soil temperature should be 70oF (21oC) and air temperature 75oF (24oC) for good germination; seed should germinate in one to two weeks; grow plants at 58oF (14.4oC) to 60oF (15.5oC); cuttings, anytime, place in sand and mist or enclose in a polyethylene plastic bag.
Varieties: Many varieties and series introduced each year with varying colors and sizes.

Dwarf forms: 8 to 10 inches tall, compact, 12-inch spacing; many colors; series includes Elfin, Elfin Improved; Elfin Improved bloom earlier and more profusely.

Semi-dwarf forms: 10 to 12 inches tall, flowers 1 to 2 inches across; spacing 14 inches, solid and bicolored blooms; series includes Duet, Fantasia, Futura, Minette, Novette, Ripple (star pattern in blooms), Rosette (blooms like a miniature rose), and Twinkle.

Tall forms: 12 to 14 inches tall, flowers 1� to 2 inches across; solid and bicolors; spacing 18 inches; series includes Grande, Blitz, Stars and Stripes, Tangelow and Treasure; New Guinea-Indonesian hybrids have leaves with red or yellow markings and variegations, to 24 inches tall; good for pot culture.

Related Species: Impatiens balsamina–Garden Balsam or Rose Balsam; annual to 2� feet; flowers axillary, close to stem, 2 inches across, many colors, some spotted.
Remarks: May be called Balsam, Sultana, Touch-Me-Not, Snap Weed, Jewel Weed, Busy Lizzy, Patient Lucy, Patience Plant or Zanzibar Balsam; may be listed asImpatiens sultana or Impatiens holstii; stems and leaves reported to be toxic.

Indoor Culture

Soil Requirement: All-purpose soil composed of two parts garden loam, one part leaf mold or peatmoss and one part coarse sand; soil must be well drained.
Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet, barely moist in winter, use water that is room temperature, it is best to let water stand overnight before using; fertilize every two weeks with a houseplant fertilizer at one-half recommended rate, reduce fertilization in winter; ideal temperatures are 50
oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC) at night and 65oF to 70oF (18oC to 21oC) during the day; repot anytime as necessary.

Situation: Bright light, 4000 to 8000 foot-candles (southern or western window), will tolerate 500 to 2000 foot-candles (northern or eastern window).

Outdoor Culture

Soil Requirements: Slightly acid to neutral, good garden loam rich in organic matter such as leaf mold or compost with liberal amounts of coarse sand for good drainage.
Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet; fertilize every two weeks with a general fertilizer; plant out-of-doors after danger of frost has passed.
Situation: Sun or partial shade

 

Growing Impatiens Indoors During Winter October 2, 2009

Growing Impatiens Indoors During Winter

_2F_images_2F_origs_2F_650_2F_impatiens_in_a_blue_and_white_pot

The really lovely thing about impatiens, is that they can make wonderful indoor flowers during the cold and often gloomy days of Winter.

Last year, I placed some on a plant tier in front of a south facing floor-ceiling length window in our breakfast area.

It was beautiful seeing these colorful, robust flowers all Winter long and it truely creates a different atmosphere in the home. A little touch of Summer bringing warmth and beauty for all to enjoy.

There are several tips that can help too:

(1.) Pick a good sunny location. I would prefer one that gets several hours of direct sunlight a day, but one that doesn’t “cook” the flowers. I use a south facing window, but any one that gets the sunlight should do.

(2.) Be sure to choose an appropriate sized pot. Remember, these will continue to grow, so it is important to allow for root growth.

(3.) I also prefer a potting soil that already has fertilizer in it and that has the ability to hold moisture.

(4.)I still however, once a week give them a little shot of Miracle Grow Bloom Booster. I love that stuff and it provides that little bit of extra nutrients for bright healthy flowers

(5.) Be careful not to over water. This can lead to collapse of the stems and leaves by rot in the root.

(6.) Also, impatiens root very easily and one thing you could do, especially if you have multiple colors and want them indoors is to snip off a longer stem and place them in water with either root stimulator or as I do a touch of bloom booster. i don’t know what it is with Bloom Booster, but I have even had marigolds root with it.

(7.) if you decide to put them in pots with other plants, be sure to companion plant with flowers of similar needs, growth habits and the like.
impatiensinabrownpot

Other helpful general info:

Soil
Plant your impatiens in soil that is rich and has plenty of aeration for drainage. You can put a few small stones, bark or vermiculite in the soil to make sure it cannot pack down completely. Keep the soil moist but not wet. Generally, impatiens like soil that is more acidic (about 5.8 on the pH scale). If the soil is too basic, add a little sulfur or aluminum sulfate. If the soil is too acidic, add a little calcium carbonate.

Water
Keep the impatiens watered, but don’t overdo it. Impatiens like more water than some other species, but they don’t tolerate soil that is waterlogged. Watering every three to four weeks should be enough if the soil is kept moist. If the water sits on top of the soil, then it is too dry and won’t absorb water well. If the water runs straight out the pot, then the soil is either waterlogged or the plant has become root-bound. You can spritz the soil with a spray bottle between regular waterings to keep the soil from becoming too dry.

Fertilizer
Use liquid fertilizer once a month. Impatiens like soil that is rich in nutrients, but plants grown indoors can lack what they need because they are confined in pots that are not exposed to natural means of soil rejuvenation. Wait until the tips of the roots reach the edge of the pot to use fertilizer; this indicates that the plant is large enough to require more from the soil than it may be able to absorb.

Temperature
Monitor the temperature in your home. At night, don’t let the temperature dip below 68 degrees. During the day, don’t let the temperature rise above 75 degrees.

Cuttings and Number of Plants Per Pot
Take cuttings from your impatiens when the plant starts to become unruly. This allows you to keep the plant well-shaped and to encourage new growth. The cuttings then can be used to propagate new plants. Aim for only one or two plants per 5-inch pot.

impatiengreenpot

 

Basic Facts About Impatiens October 30, 2008

   Basic Facts About Impatiens   

Richard K. Zimmerman
WVU Extension Service
Plant Sciences & Conservation Specialist Family: Balsaminaceae–Balsam family
Scientific Name: Impatiens wallerana                           
Origin: Tanzania to Mozambique
Classification: Annual, houseplant
Use: Hanging basket, bedding, pot culture, window boxes
Height: 9 to 30 inches
Spread: 9 to 30 inches
Hardiness: Indoors 50oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC); outdoors until frost
Flowers: Early summer to fall; solitary in racemes on terminal and axillary shoots; up to 2½ inches in diameter; solid colors of white, pink, salmon, purple, orange or red, and many bicolor; single, double and semi-double; numerous
Fruit: Capsule, ¾ inch long, glabrous
Stems (Bark): Herbaceous, fleshy, green
Foliage: Alternative, upper leaves sometimes opposite; lanceolate-ovate; green or reddish green on both surfaces
Texture: Fine to medium
Growth Rate: Rapid
Form: Spreading, rounded, flat topped
Insects & Diseases: Scale, spider mites, aphids; damping off
Propagation: Seed sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks before last occurrence of frost (late February to mid-March); give bright light but not direct sun; artificial lights, such as Grow Lamps, should be used–place 6 to 12 inches above the flats for 12 to 14 hours a day; soil temperature should be 70oF (21oC) and air temperature 75oF (24oC) for good germination; seed should germinate in one to two weeks; grow plants at 58oF (14.4oC) to 60oF (15.5oC); cuttings, anytime, place in sand and mist or enclose in a polyethylene plastic bag.
Varieties: Many varieties and series introduced each year with varying colors and sizes.

Dwarf forms: 8 to 10 inches tall, compact, 12-inch spacing; many colors; series includes Elfin, Elfin Improved; Elfin Improved bloom earlier and more profusely.

Semi-dwarf forms: 10 to 12 inches tall, flowers 1 to 2 inches across; spacing 14 inches, solid and bicolored blooms; series includes Duet, Fantasia, Futura, Minette, Novette, Ripple (star pattern in blooms), Rosette (blooms like a miniature rose), and Twinkle.

Tall forms: 12 to 14 inches tall, flowers 1½ to 2 inches across; solid and bicolors; spacing 18 inches; series includes Grande, Blitz, Stars and Stripes, Tangelow and Treasure; New Guinea-Indonesian hybrids have leaves with red or yellow markings and variegations, to 24 inches tall; good for pot culture.

Related Species: Impatiens balsamina–Garden Balsam or Rose Balsam; annual to 2½ feet; flowers axillary, close to stem, 2 inches across, many colors, some spotted.
Remarks: May be called Balsam, Sultana, Touch-Me-Not, Snap Weed, Jewel Weed, Busy Lizzy, Patient Lucy, Patience Plant or Zanzibar Balsam; may be listed as Impatiens sultana or Impatiens holstii; stems and leaves reported to be toxic.

Indoor Culture

Soil Requirement: All-purpose soil composed of two parts garden loam, one part leaf mold or peatmoss and one part coarse sand; soil must be well drained.
Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet, barely moist in winter, use water that is room temperature, it is best to let water stand overnight before using; fertilize every two weeks with a houseplant fertilizer at one-half recommended rate, reduce fertilization in winter; ideal temperatures are 50oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC) at night and 65oF to 70oF (18oC to 21oC) during the day; repot anytime as necessary.
Situation: Bright light, 4000 to 8000 foot-candles (southern or western window), will tolerate 500 to 2000 foot-candles (northern or eastern window).

Outdoor Culture

Soil Requirements: Slightly acid to neutral, good garden loam rich in organic matter such as leaf mold or compost with liberal amounts of coarse sand for good drainage.
Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet; fertilize every two weeks with a general fertilizer; plant out-of-doors after danger of frost has passed.
Situation: Sun or partial shade

wvu.edu                                 

 

Welcome to Impatiens

Filed under: Annuals,Flower gardening,Impatiens — patoconnor @ 9:35 pm
Tags: , , , ,

   Welcome to Impatiens    

I have some thirty-six other internet sites on prose, inspirational writings and medical conditions.  But, I needed a change and what a better idea could there be then starting some blogs on my favorite flowers and ideas on gardening.

This past week I have developed five other sites on flowers.  I have chosen some of my very favorite ones…ones that I have grown for many years as an active gardener. 

I grow impatiens by the thousands.  They are a spectacular border flower and come in a myriad of different colors and combinations….and they are practically care free.  Down here in Georgia, they will also often self seed.  Finally, butterflies and hummingbirds adore them.

Enjoy!              

Pat O’Connor

10/31/08

This replaces my previous Impatiens blog on AOL as they closed Hometown.