Impatiens

Classic almost care free summer annual. Beautiful full clusters of flowers that butterflies and hummingbirds love.

New Impatiens for 2007 October 30, 2008

New Impatiens for 2007

New Impatiens Introductions: Simply Beautiful Fusion & Fanfare Impatiens Series

Impatiens with Orchid Like Blooms and Tropical Colors (Even Yellow!) Impatiens are a garden favorite because they deliver long lasting color in shade. Reds, pinks, lavenders and pure white Impatiens will brighten any dark corner throughout the growing season. Impatiens have indeed become a garden standard.

The breeders at Ball Horticultural Company have recently introduced two new series of Impatiens that are testing very positively. They are both released under the Simply Beautiful brand name: Simply Beautiful Fusion™ series and Simply Beautiful Fanfare™ series.

Simply Beautiful Fusion

The Fusion Impatiens series has the distinction of offering the first yellow Impatiens flowers. It took breeders years to isolate and stabilize Fusion Impatiens ‘Glow’ from its  wild parent, but it was worth the effort.       From their effortscreating “glow” came a whole series of exotic warm colors. Fusion ‘Radiance’ is coral with a rust center. Fusion ‘Infrared’ is a darker coral with shades of yellow and orange. Then there’s Fusion ‘Sunset’ in apricot with a maroon center and Fusion ‘Heat’ which is a stunning rusty orange with a yellow center. The series looks almost tropical.
The Fusion series still has the non-stop blooming power of traditional Impatiens, but the flowers are an interesting cup shape with a deeper colored center. Ball likens them to orchid shaped flowers.
Mature plants will reach 12 – 16″ in height and width.
Maintenance of the Fusion Impatiens Series.
The Fusion series is as undemanding as common Impatiens, but since these annual flowers are going to bloom until frost, you’ll want to give them a rich, well drained soil to grow in.

You can amend the soil with organic matter or use a slow-release fertilizer when planting.

  • Mulch after planting and give them a light feeding every 6 – 8 weeks.
  • Fusion Impatiens enjoy a little sun in the morning, but prefer afternoon shade.
  • Heat and humidity don’t seem to faze them.
  • If they should begin to look leggy toward the end of summer, Fusion Impatiens can be rejuvenated by shearing them back by about 1/3. New growth and flowers will follow shortly.
  • To find a garden center that carries the Fusion Impatiens Series, check the

    Simply Beautiful website. Keep reading to learn about the trailing  Fanfare Impatiens Series.               

    Trailing Impatiens: Simply Beautiful Fanfare Impatiens Series

    Perfect for Hanging Around in the Shade

    Simply Beautiful Fanfare

    Maintenance of the Fanfare Impatiens Series

    The exciting news about the Simply Beautiful Fanfare Impatiens series is that they are spreaders and trailers. These Impatiens look incredible in hanging baskets and containers. Of course they are equally at home in beds and since they spread, you’ll need fewer to cover the same amount of space as traditional Impatiens. They have the added bonus of handling heat better than common Impatiens.

    The Fanfare Impatiens series comes in 6 colors: Fuchsia, Blush, Lavender, Orange, Pink Sparkle and the latest, Bright Coral. Mature plants reach a height of 16 – 20″ and can spread up to 2 feet.

    As with the Fusion Impatiens series Fanfare Impatiens are no fuss plants. keep in mind that flowers that bloom profusely benefit from a rich soil and some periodic supplemental feeding during the growing season.

    • You can amend the soil with organic matter or use a slow-release fertilizer when planting.
    • Mulch after planting and give them a light feeding every 6 – 8 weeks.
    • Fusions Impatiens enjoy a little sun in the morning, but prefer afternoon shade.
    • Heat and humidity don’t seem to faze them.
    • If they should begin to look leggy toward the end of summer, Fusion Impatiens can be rejuvenated by shearing them back by about 1/3. New growth and flowers will follow shortly.

    To find a garden center that carries the Fanfare Impatiens Series, check the Simply Beautiful website.     

    garden about.com

    Other New Varieties Include:

    Devine Pink             Envoy Cherry              Extreme Utopia

            

    website

     

    Diseases of Impatiens

           Diseases of Impatiens   

    Disease Symptoms Pathogen/Cause Management
    Alternaria Leaf Spot Target-like spots, often with purple or dark-colored borders form on the leaves. Alternaria spp. Reduce humidity and maintain good air circulation. Do not space plants too closely. Remove fading flowers and yellowing leaves. Apply iprodione, mancozeb, or triflumizole to protect plants. If plants are not flowering, chlorothalonil can be applied.
    Botrytis Blight Flowers are spotted and stems rot. Botrytis cinerea Reduce humidity and maintain good air circulation. Do not space plants too closely. Remove fading flowers and yellowing leaves. Apply iprodione to protect plants. If plants are not flowering, chlorothalonil can be applied.
    Bacterial Fasciation Plants are stunted and have many short shoots at the crown. Corynebacterium fascians Discard infected plants. Do not propagate from infected plants. Propagate and plant in pasteurized potting media.
    Damping-Off Stems at the soil line die and plants collapse. Pythium or Rhizoctonia Plant in pasteurized potting media. Keep hose ends off the ground. Apply etridiazole + thiophanate methyl to protect plants.
    Necrotic Spot Ring spots on leaves. Growing tips may die. Severe stunting. Impatiens necrotic spot virus Discard infected plants. Control thrips that carry the virus. Do not propagate from infected plants.
    Powdery Mildew (New guinea impatiens) White, mealy fungal growth develops on the top of leaves. Sometimes, heavy gray growth develops.  Oidium Apply triflumizole to protect plants. If plants are not flowering, chlorothalonil can be applied.
    Pythium Root Rot Lower leaves wilt, leaves fall and the plant dies. Pythium spp. Pot in pasteurized, pathogen-free media. Keep hose ends off the ground. Apply mefenoxam or fosetyl-Al to protect healthy plants.
    Rhizoctonia Stem Rot Stems wilt and collapse.  Rhizoctonia Pot in pasteurized, pathogen-free media. Keep hose ends off the ground. Apply PCNB.
    Thielaviopsis Root Rot Roots become dark brown and rot as microscopic spores form in the cells. Lower stems have sunken lesions when infected. Thielaviopsis basicola Pot in pasteurized, pathogen-free media. Keep hose ends off the ground. Apply etridiazole + thiophanate methyl or triflumizole to protect plants.
    Verticillium Wilt Lower leaves yellow and fall. Infected plants may recover. Verticillium dahliae Pot in pasteurized, pathogen-free media. Do not take cuttings infected plants.

    psu.edu

     

    How to Grow Impatiens

    How to Grow Impatiens

     

           

    How to Grow Impatiens

    Annuals and some Perennials

    Impatiens are one of the more popular plants for shade gardens, and indoors as houseplants. Compact plants with glossy foliage looks great in the flowerbed, in containers, and in hanging baskets. Originating in Asia, North America and South Africa, there are a wide variety of Impatiens. Most home gardeners know Impatiens as small plants, growing less than 24″. However, some varieties can grow several feet.

    Gardeners grow Impatiens as much for their attractive foliage, as they do for the profusion of flowers when in bloom. Attractive plants with thick stems and light green leaves are cheerful indoors. You can take your pick of a wide variety of colors, including white, pink, red, lilac, rose, and salmon.

    Also called “Touch-Me-Not’s” and “Snapweed”, they are very popular as houseplants. Impatiens are fun to grow indoors. They are also very popular in hanging baskets.

    Propagation:

    Grow Impatiens from seed. We recommend an indoor start using a heated germination mat.  Allow plants several weeks to grow before setting outside, or transplanting into pots or hanging baskets.

    Propagation can also be done by cuttings. Cut 3″ – 4″ stems, and immediately plantstems into a bed of moist sand, loam, or peat moss. Keep soil moist while rooting.

    How to Grow:

    Grow Impatiens in partial to full shade. They prefer rich, loose, well draining soil.

    Water plants regularly. These plants are often grown grouped together. As a result, the plants can quickly absorb soil moisture, especially when grown in containers and hanging baskets.

    Add a general purpose fertilizer once a month. For containers, pots and baskets, use liquid fertilizer twice a month. Houseplant spikes work good.

    Most Impatiens grow 12-24″ tall. In the garden, space plants 12-18 inches apart.

    Keep your plants looking neat and attractive. Remove any dead leaves and stems, along with spent blooms. This will help to minimize disease problems, too.

    Impatiens are susceptible to frost. Bring them indoors before Jack Frost visits your garden.

    Insect and Disease:

    Aphids and mites can be a problem. Apply insecticides as needed.

    If disease problems occur, treat early with fungicide.

    Shade Lovers

    If you are looking for shade lovers, Impatiens is the plant for you. They do well in the shady parts of your yard, make excellent indoor houseplants, and  are very showy in hanging baskets. Impatiens have glossy, attractive leaves which you will enjoy when the plants are not in bloom.

    Very popular as houseplants, Impatiens are fun to grow indoors. Plants are compact.and will brighten up your home in winter. You can take your pick of a wide variety of colors, and some bi-colored varieties.

    Did you know? Impatiens are also called “Touch-Me-Not’s and Snapweed”. Why? Because water builds up in the seed walls, and can burst when touched, spraying seeds all over.

    Propagation:

    Impatiens are grown from seed, requiring both light and heat to germinate. Use a germination mat or  place them on top of a warm appliance. They are best started indoors since plants have a long development period.

    Cuttings can easily be made from established plants. Once your plant is established, you can make cuttings for basket and containers for all of your friends!

    garden hobbies.com                   

     

     

    Basic Facts About Impatiens

       Basic Facts About Impatiens   

    Richard K. Zimmerman
    WVU Extension Service
    Plant Sciences & Conservation Specialist Family: Balsaminaceae–Balsam family
    Scientific Name: Impatiens wallerana                           
    Origin: Tanzania to Mozambique
    Classification: Annual, houseplant
    Use: Hanging basket, bedding, pot culture, window boxes
    Height: 9 to 30 inches
    Spread: 9 to 30 inches
    Hardiness: Indoors 50oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC); outdoors until frost
    Flowers: Early summer to fall; solitary in racemes on terminal and axillary shoots; up to 2½ inches in diameter; solid colors of white, pink, salmon, purple, orange or red, and many bicolor; single, double and semi-double; numerous
    Fruit: Capsule, ¾ inch long, glabrous
    Stems (Bark): Herbaceous, fleshy, green
    Foliage: Alternative, upper leaves sometimes opposite; lanceolate-ovate; green or reddish green on both surfaces
    Texture: Fine to medium
    Growth Rate: Rapid
    Form: Spreading, rounded, flat topped
    Insects & Diseases: Scale, spider mites, aphids; damping off
    Propagation: Seed sown indoors 6 to 8 weeks before last occurrence of frost (late February to mid-March); give bright light but not direct sun; artificial lights, such as Grow Lamps, should be used–place 6 to 12 inches above the flats for 12 to 14 hours a day; soil temperature should be 70oF (21oC) and air temperature 75oF (24oC) for good germination; seed should germinate in one to two weeks; grow plants at 58oF (14.4oC) to 60oF (15.5oC); cuttings, anytime, place in sand and mist or enclose in a polyethylene plastic bag.
    Varieties: Many varieties and series introduced each year with varying colors and sizes.

    Dwarf forms: 8 to 10 inches tall, compact, 12-inch spacing; many colors; series includes Elfin, Elfin Improved; Elfin Improved bloom earlier and more profusely.

    Semi-dwarf forms: 10 to 12 inches tall, flowers 1 to 2 inches across; spacing 14 inches, solid and bicolored blooms; series includes Duet, Fantasia, Futura, Minette, Novette, Ripple (star pattern in blooms), Rosette (blooms like a miniature rose), and Twinkle.

    Tall forms: 12 to 14 inches tall, flowers 1½ to 2 inches across; solid and bicolors; spacing 18 inches; series includes Grande, Blitz, Stars and Stripes, Tangelow and Treasure; New Guinea-Indonesian hybrids have leaves with red or yellow markings and variegations, to 24 inches tall; good for pot culture.

    Related Species: Impatiens balsamina–Garden Balsam or Rose Balsam; annual to 2½ feet; flowers axillary, close to stem, 2 inches across, many colors, some spotted.
    Remarks: May be called Balsam, Sultana, Touch-Me-Not, Snap Weed, Jewel Weed, Busy Lizzy, Patient Lucy, Patience Plant or Zanzibar Balsam; may be listed as Impatiens sultana or Impatiens holstii; stems and leaves reported to be toxic.

    Indoor Culture

    Soil Requirement: All-purpose soil composed of two parts garden loam, one part leaf mold or peatmoss and one part coarse sand; soil must be well drained.
    Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet, barely moist in winter, use water that is room temperature, it is best to let water stand overnight before using; fertilize every two weeks with a houseplant fertilizer at one-half recommended rate, reduce fertilization in winter; ideal temperatures are 50oF to 55oF (10oC to 13oC) at night and 65oF to 70oF (18oC to 21oC) during the day; repot anytime as necessary.
    Situation: Bright light, 4000 to 8000 foot-candles (southern or western window), will tolerate 500 to 2000 foot-candles (northern or eastern window).

    Outdoor Culture

    Soil Requirements: Slightly acid to neutral, good garden loam rich in organic matter such as leaf mold or compost with liberal amounts of coarse sand for good drainage.
    Maintenance: Keep moist but not wet; fertilize every two weeks with a general fertilizer; plant out-of-doors after danger of frost has passed.
    Situation: Sun or partial shade

    wvu.edu                                 

     

    Welcome to Impatiens

    Filed under: Annuals,Flower gardening,Impatiens — patoconnor @ 9:35 pm
    Tags: , , , ,

       Welcome to Impatiens    

    I have some thirty-six other internet sites on prose, inspirational writings and medical conditions.  But, I needed a change and what a better idea could there be then starting some blogs on my favorite flowers and ideas on gardening.

    This past week I have developed five other sites on flowers.  I have chosen some of my very favorite ones…ones that I have grown for many years as an active gardener. 

    I grow impatiens by the thousands.  They are a spectacular border flower and come in a myriad of different colors and combinations….and they are practically care free.  Down here in Georgia, they will also often self seed.  Finally, butterflies and hummingbirds adore them.

    Enjoy!              

    Pat O’Connor

    10/31/08

    This replaces my previous Impatiens blog on AOL as they closed Hometown.